Ten years ago, Kentucky native Ben Sollee came to prominence singing Sam Cooke while playing the cello. In the decade following, Sollee has recorded roughly an album a year (and nearly that many EPs), in a daunting variety of settings.

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Ten years ago, Kentucky native Ben Sollee came to prominence singing Sam Cooke while playing the cello. The NPR sensation was not a backwoods novelty. Sollee’s spare, exultant interpretation of “A Change is Gonna Come” announced the arrival of a relentlessly curious musical soul for whom change constantly comes.
In the decade following, Sollee has recorded roughly an album a year (and nearly that many EPs), in a daunting variety of settings. He has played with trance bluesman Otis Taylor, with banjo virtuosos Abigail Washburn and Bela Fleck (in the Sparrow Quartet, with Casey Driessen), and collaborated with Jim James of My Morning Jacket, with DJs, acoustic musicians, visual artists, software specialists and environmentalists. He has composed ballets and music for films and for stage. He has helped raise his son and support his family with an ambitious tour schedule. He has cycled 5,000 miles by bike, towing his cello “Kay” behind him as part of the “Ditch The Van” tours.
He has relentlessly made and studied and thought about art and the environment. And life, and how to make the world around him better.
Sollee describes his newest release, Ben Sollee and Kentucky Native (the name describing both the ensemble and the album) as a bluegrass record, fully aware that his is not the traditional view. “Bluegrass music is immigrant music,” he says. “It’s the music of Irish and Scottish musicians bringing their fiddle tunes; it is gospel music; it is African music; it is gypsy jazz; it is rock ‘n’ roll. It is all these things. What makes it unique and of Kentucky is that it was distilled by the people who lived here in Kentucky, and turned into something else.”

We are proud to welcome all types of concerts to our stage.  Occasionally during a performance, audience members will show their enthusiasm by standing and dancing, especially when encouraged by the performers to do so. Unless directed by the show, we do not enforce a “must-sit” policy at concerts. For most concerts this would not be acceptable to the performers on stage who often love it when the crowd is moved enough by the performance to stand. This is especially true for rock shows and for seats closest to the stage.

We do not have a “no standing” policy and, in most situations, will allow guests to stand even if they block the view of the stage for other guests. If your view is ever blocked by a standing or dancing guest, please contact an usher and we’ll attempt to find alternative seating.

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