Comedian Lewis Black has always aligned the names of his tours with what is going on in the world around him. By naming this tour “The Joke’s On Us”, Black says it’s his way of realizing we’ve sort of reached the end of the line.

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Comedian Lewis Black has always aligned the names of his tours with what is going on in the world around him. by naming this tour “The Joke’s On Us”, Black says it’s his way of realizing we’ve sort of reached the end of the line.

According to an article last fall about the “Joke’s On Us” tour, Black is reported as saying, “We’ve tried intelligence, and that didn’t work, so now let’s go for stupid. “But it’s not just [Trump]. When you’re standing around, having to waste time with people to discuss how 97 percent of the world’s scientists believe there’s climate change, it’s absurd. We’re in the late innings here. We don’t have time to discuss this anymore. I’m not going to sit here and discuss whether the earth is flat….” The article adds that Black ” really could care less about Trump’s antics. That allows him to craft his set around more pressing issues instead of Trump, who Black feels is ‘good for comedy the way a stroke is good for a nap.’ ”

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About Lewis Black:

Known as the king of the rant,  Lewis Black uses his trademark style of comedic yelling and animated finger-pointing to skewer anything and anyone that gets under his skin. His comedic brilliance lies in his ability to make people laugh at the absurdities of life, with topics that include current events, social media, politics and anything else that exposes the hypocrisy and madness he sees in the world.

 

Born in Washington D.C. on Aug. 30, 1948, Black was raised in Silver Spring, Md. Colicky as a baby, he was destined to be angry and easily irritated.

In 1996, his friend Lizz Winstead tapped him to create a weekly segment for Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show.” The segment, a three-minute rant about whatever was bothering him at the moment, evolved into “Back in Black”, becoming one of the most popular and longest-running segments on the show for both the Jon Stewart era, and now The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.  Black has also taped four specials for the “Comedy Central Presents” series, co-created “Last Laugh with Lewis Black” and presided over “Lewis Black’s The Root of All Evil.” His popular appearances on Comedy Central helped to win him Best Male Stand-Up at the American Comedy Awards in 2001.

Black has appeared on “Larry King Live,” “Piers Morgan Tonight,” “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” “The Late Show with David Letterman,” “Late Night with Conan O’ Brian” and “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson.” Black has also had numerous appearances on CNN and MSNBC and has occasionally done the weather with Al Roker.

In the midst of a rigorous touring schedule, regular TV appearances and movie roles, Black has written three best-selling books: “Nothing’s Sacred” (Simon and Schuster, 2005), “Me of Little Faith” (Riverhead Books, 2008) and “I’m Dreaming of a Black Christmas” (Riverhead Books, 2010). All garnered critical praise as well commercial success and spent numerous weeks on the New York Times best sellers list.

Black has penned more than 40 plays, many of which have been produced around the country. “The Deal,” a dark comedy about business, was made into a short film in 1998 and picked up by the Sundance Channel. In 2011, his play “One Slight Hitch” was produced at the Williamstown Theatre Festival and then again in 2012 at both the ACT Theatre in Seattle and The George Street Theatre in New Brunswick.

He continues to tour heavily, playing countless dates each year and providing a cathartic release of anger and disillusionment for his audience. In his leisure time, Black likes to play golf, even though golf hates him.

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