The Capitol Center welcomes poet, memoirist and professor Cynthia Huntington to the Kimball House as part of its 2016-17 Salon Series, a thought provoking series of talks that highlight some of the significant artistic work being developed in the region.

The Capitol Center welcomes poet, memoirist and professor Cynthia Huntington to the Kimball House as part of its 2016-17 Salon Series, a thought provoking series of talks that highlight some of the significant artistic work being developed in the region.  Please join us in an intimate, engaging discussion with Cynthia Huntington about her work and evolution as a poet.

Huntington’s free verse poems often examine the bare mind, restlessly turning the form of the individual against both built and natural environments, mapping both threat and respite against a shifting screen of personal memory. Introducing her early work in a 1993 issue of the Boston Review, poet Donald Hall describes Huntington’s work as “ poetry of the intellect laid out in brawny unpredictable style,” observing, “Cynthia Huntington writes poems by the sentence, punctuated by the line, and by a vocabulary of nice distinctions. Hers is a poetry of wit, surprise, observation, and exemplary intelligence.”

Huntington is the author of several collections of poetry and nonfiction prose volumes, including The Fish-Wife (1985); The Salt House (1998); We Have Gone to the Beach (1996, winner of the Beatrice Hawley Award and Jane Kenyon Awards); Levis Prize-winner The Radiant (2003); and Heavenly Bodies (2012, nominated for a National Book Award), Fire Muse ( 2016), and Terra Nova (coming in 2017).

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